Australia’s Silent Film Festival

“It’s like writing history with lightning!” – President Woodrow Wilson, upon seeing his first film in 1915

Sydney (Jul 5 + 19, 2020 + Aug 16, 2020 [Apr – Jun, 2020 Screenings Postponed])

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The Cameraman (1928) “Buster Keaton is at the peak of his slapstick powers in The Cameraman—the first film that the silent-screen legend made after signing with MGM, and his last great masterpiece. The final work over which he maintained creative control, this clever farce is the culmination of an extraordinary, decade-long run that produced some of the most innovative and enduring comedies of all time. Keaton plays a hapless newsreel cameraman desperate to impress both his new employer and his winsome office crush as he zigzags up and down Manhattan hustling for a scoop. Along the way, he goes for a swim (and winds up soaked), becomes embroiled in a Chinatown Tong War, and teams up with a memorable monkey sidekick (the famous Josephine). The marvellously inventive film-within-a-film setup allows Keaton’s imagination to run wild, yielding both sly insights into the travails of moviemaking and an emotional payoff of disarming poignancy.” Melbourne born Sidney Bracey appears in the film. Across the silent and sound eras he acted in almost 350 films https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0102718/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t4 starting in films in 1909! See a clip at https://www.amazon.com/23004ad0-1d13-46ea-a763-b2bbeebda567 Access an excellent essay at https://silentfilm.org/the-cameraman-1/ and notes at https://festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/en/proiezione/the-cameraman/
The Cameraman (1928) “Buster Keaton is at the peak of his slapstick powers in The Cameraman—the first film that the silent-screen legend made after signing with MGM, and his last great masterpiece. The final work over which he maintained creative control, this clever farce is the culmination of an extraordinary, decade-long run that produced some of the most innovative and enduring comedies of all time. Keaton plays a hapless newsreel cameraman desperate to impress both his new employer and his winsome office crush as he zigzags up and down Manhattan hustling for a scoop. Along the way, he goes for a swim (and winds up soaked), becomes embroiled in a Chinatown Tong War, and teams up with a memorable monkey sidekick (the famous Josephine). The marvellously inventive film-within-a-film setup allows Keaton’s imagination to run wild, yielding both sly insights into the travails of moviemaking and an emotional payoff of disarming poignancy.” Melbourne born Sidney Bracey appears in the film. Across the silent and sound eras he acted in almost 350 films https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0102718/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t4 starting in films in 1909! See a clip at https://www.amazon.com/23004ad0-1d13-46ea-a763-b2bbeebda567 Access an excellent essay at https://silentfilm.org/the-cameraman-1/ and notes at https://festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/en/proiezione/the-cameraman/
The Cameraman (1928) “Buster Keaton is at the peak of his slapstick powers in The Cameraman—the first film that the silent-screen legend made after signing with MGM, and his last great masterpiece. The final work over which he maintained creative control, this clever farce is the culmination of an extraordinary, decade-long run that produced some of the most innovative and enduring comedies of all time. Keaton plays a hapless newsreel cameraman desperate to impress both his new employer and his winsome office crush as he zigzags up and down Manhattan hustling for a scoop. Along the way, he goes for a swim (and winds up soaked), becomes embroiled in a Chinatown Tong War, and teams up with a memorable monkey sidekick (the famous Josephine). The marvellously inventive film-within-a-film setup allows Keaton’s imagination to run wild, yielding both sly insights into the travails of moviemaking and an emotional payoff of disarming poignancy.” Melbourne born Sidney Bracey appears in the film. Across the silent and sound eras he acted in almost 350 films https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0102718/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t4 starting in films in 1909! See a clip at https://www.amazon.com/23004ad0-1d13-46ea-a763-b2bbeebda567 Access an excellent essay at https://silentfilm.org/the-cameraman-1/ and notes at https://festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/en/proiezione/the-cameraman/
The Cameraman (1928) “Buster Keaton is at the peak of his slapstick powers in The Cameraman—the first film that the silent-screen legend made after signing with MGM, and his last great masterpiece. The final work over which he maintained creative control, this clever farce is the culmination of an extraordinary, decade-long run that produced some of the most innovative and enduring comedies of all time. Keaton plays a hapless newsreel cameraman desperate to impress both his new employer and his winsome office crush as he zigzags up and down Manhattan hustling for a scoop. Along the way, he goes for a swim (and winds up soaked), becomes embroiled in a Chinatown Tong War, and teams up with a memorable monkey sidekick (the famous Josephine). The marvellously inventive film-within-a-film setup allows Keaton’s imagination to run wild, yielding both sly insights into the travails of moviemaking and an emotional payoff of disarming poignancy.” Melbourne born Sidney Bracey appears in the film. Across the silent and sound eras he acted in almost 350 films https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0102718/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t4 starting in films in 1909! See a clip at https://www.amazon.com/23004ad0-1d13-46ea-a763-b2bbeebda567 Access an excellent essay at https://silentfilm.org/the-cameraman-1/ and notes at https://festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/en/proiezione/the-cameraman/
The Cameraman (1928) “Buster Keaton is at the peak of his slapstick powers in The Cameraman—the first film that the silent-screen legend made after signing with MGM, and his last great masterpiece. The final work over which he maintained creative control, this clever farce is the culmination of an extraordinary, decade-long run that produced some of the most innovative and enduring comedies of all time. Keaton plays a hapless newsreel cameraman desperate to impress both his new employer and his winsome office crush as he zigzags up and down Manhattan hustling for a scoop. Along the way, he goes for a swim (and winds up soaked), becomes embroiled in a Chinatown Tong War, and teams up with a memorable monkey sidekick (the famous Josephine). The marvellously inventive film-within-a-film setup allows Keaton’s imagination to run wild, yielding both sly insights into the travails of moviemaking and an emotional payoff of disarming poignancy.” Melbourne born Sidney Bracey appears in the film. Across the silent and sound eras he acted in almost 350 films https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0102718/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t4 starting in films in 1909! See a clip at https://www.amazon.com/23004ad0-1d13-46ea-a763-b2bbeebda567 Access an excellent essay at https://silentfilm.org/the-cameraman-1/ and notes at https://festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/en/proiezione/the-cameraman/
The Cameraman (1928) “Buster Keaton is at the peak of his slapstick powers in The Cameraman—the first film that the silent-screen legend made after signing with MGM, and his last great masterpiece. The final work over which he maintained creative control, this clever farce is the culmination of an extraordinary, decade-long run that produced some of the most innovative and enduring comedies of all time. Keaton plays a hapless newsreel cameraman desperate to impress both his new employer and his winsome office crush as he zigzags up and down Manhattan hustling for a scoop. Along the way, he goes for a swim (and winds up soaked), becomes embroiled in a Chinatown Tong War, and teams up with a memorable monkey sidekick (the famous Josephine). The marvellously inventive film-within-a-film setup allows Keaton’s imagination to run wild, yielding both sly insights into the travails of moviemaking and an emotional payoff of disarming poignancy.” Melbourne born Sidney Bracey appears in the film. Across the silent and sound eras he acted in almost 350 films https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0102718/?ref_=ttfc_fc_cl_t4 starting in films in 1909! See a clip at https://www.amazon.com/23004ad0-1d13-46ea-a763-b2bbeebda567 Access an excellent essay at https://silentfilm.org/the-cameraman-1/ and notes at https://festival.ilcinemaritrovato.it/en/proiezione/the-cameraman/
King of Jazz (1930), “Made during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers—all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson. Presented here in the most complete form possible and restored to its original early-Technicolor glory, King of Jazz offers a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s.” See the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhOTXZZdaR8 and an item about the film’s restoration by Michael Daruty, NBC Universal’s Global Media Operations, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbYRnCwlIUs Access an excellent essay at https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5511-now-you-has-king-of-jazz
King of Jazz (1930), “Made during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers—all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson. Presented here in the most complete form possible and restored to its original early-Technicolor glory, King of Jazz offers a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s.” See the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhOTXZZdaR8 and an item about the film’s restoration by Michael Daruty, NBC Universal’s Global Media Operations, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbYRnCwlIUs Access an excellent essay at https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5511-now-you-has-king-of-jazz
King of Jazz (1930), “Made during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers—all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson. Presented here in the most complete form possible and restored to its original early-Technicolor glory, King of Jazz offers a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s.” See the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhOTXZZdaR8 and an item about the film’s restoration by Michael Daruty, NBC Universal’s Global Media Operations, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbYRnCwlIUs Access an excellent essay at https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5511-now-you-has-king-of-jazz
King of Jazz (1930), “Made during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers—all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson. Presented here in the most complete form possible and restored to its original early-Technicolor glory, King of Jazz offers a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s.” See the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhOTXZZdaR8 and an item about the film’s restoration by Michael Daruty, NBC Universal’s Global Media Operations, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbYRnCwlIUs Access an excellent essay at https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5511-now-you-has-king-of-jazz
King of Jazz (1930), “Made during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers—all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson. Presented here in the most complete form possible and restored to its original early-Technicolor glory, King of Jazz offers a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s.” See the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhOTXZZdaR8 and an item about the film’s restoration by Michael Daruty, NBC Universal’s Global Media Operations, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbYRnCwlIUs Access an excellent essay at https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5511-now-you-has-king-of-jazz
King of Jazz (1930), “Made during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers—all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson. Presented here in the most complete form possible and restored to its original early-Technicolor glory, King of Jazz offers a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s.” See the trailer at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VhOTXZZdaR8 and an item about the film’s restoration by Michael Daruty, NBC Universal’s Global Media Operations, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbYRnCwlIUs Access an excellent essay at https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/5511-now-you-has-king-of-jazz
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